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Spacemusic Reviews

ST∆ER: Telemetry

Telemetry

Telemetry

ST∆ER: Telemetry (61:54)
Released: 3 September 2019
staer.bandcamp.com

The mind of Ian Staer is ever moving, through regions dark and light. Recording and playing concerts under the name ST∆ER his work communicates interiority, transmitting the composer’s interior landscape to the audience in very effective ways. The release Telemetry (61’54”) features recordings from live performances for WXPN/Star’s End on 12 May 2019 and WPRB/Music with Space on 21 June 2019. By listening to this album, you have taken your first steps onto a larger world – a realm where the human hand and eye has taken over from the computer. Utilizing conventional synthesizer keyboards alongside modular systems, Staer moves our bodies to the pulse of the galaxy while energizing our minds at the speed of sound. To realize the works found on Telemetry Staer set out with a unique organizational framework from which the fabric of his compositions are woven. Influencing the listener’s perception of discord, accord, tension and release, he tells his story – and we make our journey. Something urgent is running beneath the surface of this music. Harmonies breathe with the intricacies of proportion, consonance, dissonance and resonance. Chords rise and fall, then push and pull one another above mechanized sequencer energy. Consisting of live versions of two previously released arrangements, and two new pieces realized especially for the concert setting, the contour of this album traces a dynamic arc. From minimalist patterns meant to arouse the adventurous, and questioning interludes of metallic drones, to dramatic piano themes and wondrously modulated aural accents, the mounting tension resolves into a plane of possibility and wonder. Yet, although analyzing each movement may be an interesting occupation, taken on the whole Telemetry transcends its individual parts. The act of conceiving this music, learning how to play it live, overcoming doubt, then producing this CD has lead to Ian Staer declaring himself – in what will surely be thought of as a substantial milestone once he has traveled further along his path. But now, what sets this musician apart from his contemporaries is an enthusiasm, optimism and ambition found only in the beginner – one who knows that the only limit there is on the future are the doubts of today.

Chuck van Zyl/STAR’S END – 8 August 2019

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Miles Richmond & Peter Grenader w/Steve Roach: POV

POV

POV

Miles Richmand & Peter Grenader w/Steve Roach: POV
Released: 5 July 2019
www.pov-music.com

In a sound voyage through dream lands, electric guitarist Miles Richmond and synth-smith Peter Grenader, along with Spacemusic icon Steve Roach have realized POV (61’01”) – an album of fluent and unified music. At times a casual ramble, while at others a vast soul-searching ascent, this deeply lived work leaves the light of our mind on, but with its engine slowed considerably. In six substantially structured tracks Richmond & Grenader with Roach trace graceful compositional arcs. Their creations initially progress in a prevailing sense of propulsion, but further in they go deep, down, dark – descending into a twilight territory. Synthesizers and processed guitar all figure into the arrangement. Lushly orchestrated, POV moves calm, warm whirlpools of tones through thickening electronic drones. As emotionally charged liquid lead lines snake over rolling ambient loops and washes, the listener will gain a feel for texture, gesture and atmosphere. With darkness resolving into light, this album softens. In trembling, shadowy chords, and guitar quotes drawn from “No Pussyfooting”, it shines with promise. POV seems meant for us to tour the cosmos, while sitting quietly in a small room… to wander past everything, into shadows forth, and heartless voids and immensities. By listening to this release, you have taken your first steps onto a larger, better realm. This work offers the feeling of being welcomed, in a way that the rest of the world simply cannot.

Chuck van Zyl/STAR’S END1 August 2019

Futuregrapher & Eric ‘the’ Taylor: Effects Of Clouds

Effects of Clouds

Effects of Clouds

Futuregrapher & Eric ‘the’ Taylor: Effects of Clouds
Released: 6 April 2019
www.neotantra.co.uk

Effects of Clouds (64’07”) fits into a category of Ambient Music that is difficult to label. Its eight musical structures caress the ear, and impress us each with their sonic variety and properly cosmic vibe. Demonstrating the many possibilities of their instruments and technology the collaboration between Futuregrapher (aka Árni Grétar Jóhannesson) & Eric ‘the’ Taylor also presents the many possibilities of their collective imagination. Throughout these whirling abstractions of electronic fragility it is unclear where to start listening – with so many fascinating textures and levels the more eager among us may want to hear this work all at once. Effects of Clouds is an easy album to become lost in. Its music is open enough in which to know our own thoughts, yet filled with a force strong enough to transfer the ideas of the musicians effectively to their audience. In a world where only the colossal will suffice, the scale of this work remains at a personal level. Some pieces sound muted, which somehow provides an unexpected intimacy. Some pieces possess an ecstatic richness, and an expressive interweaving of static harmony. And some pieces include spells of dissonance, yet retain an all-embracing spirit. But all of the pieces on this album – as they are so packed with wonder and a lofty emotional pull – will fill our space in a remarkable way. Swaths of electronics inhabit the upper reaches, to calm restless ghosts, as a mist on the verge of freezing into snow swirls in north wind currents. Sounds sit still in the gloom, while a heavy black night blots out stars – and we escape into a sonic mythology realm. Freed of the restraints of conventionally designed music, this duo pursues visions that are dreamy and surreal. Their luminous intricacy recalls New Age/Spacemusic classics of the 1980s, even while gazing toward a time yet to come. Jóhannesson and Taylor make a music that believes there is no shortage of tomorrows. As the Earth spins further forward into the future, and we all rest easily beneath a solitary sky, like rooftop antennae we wait for a strong signal – and for the Effects of Clouds.

Chuck van Zyl/STAR’S END25 July 2019

Markus Reuter: Monde trilogy

Monde vol 1

Monde vol 1

Markus Reuter: the Monde trilogy
Released: May/June/July 2019
www.iapetus-media.com
www.markusreuter.com

Modern times are not conducive to delicacy, so Markus Reuter‘s Monde trilogy may seem an indulgence – too luxurious and attuned to the long-view of life to have much of a message. Yet, past its overt calm we may feel something urgent running beneath this music’s smooth surface. Each one of the three disc set’s 27 tracks feels newborn, yet somehow ghosts beckon from every piece. On the Monde trilogy Reuter reclaims those silvery strands from the neglect of New Age and Ambient Music, and weaves them into an atmosphere so sensuous that we may easily lose ourselves within, but of such potency that we may just as easily find our self once inside. The sedated, softly sonorous string sounds, derive their sonic bloom from a learned balance of intuition and restraint – which Reuter commands after decades of studio experimentation and concert execution. His realizations were made in real-time performances with an electric guitar, and the associated processing effects, under quiet listening conditions. In touch with streams of creativity powering his mind, by way of the currents of electricity running through his guitar, Reuter’s compositions are honed, but not overworked. He has designed a gorgeous palette of textures and tones, arranged in pastoral consonance – which makes for our constantly renewed aural interest. From a single point of charged spark, to an expanse of the ether, this music shines in the brilliance of its imaginative scope. Aligning with the values of good Spacemusic it bestows a mental state that runs counter to that of the world outside. So long as we remain open to the seduction of Monde‘s understated drama and beautiful natural sound, may we enter its eerie darkness, to return later… up through reassuring light.

Chuck van Zyl/STAR’S END18 July 2019

Dave Fulton: The Defective AI

The Defective AI

The Defective AI

Dave Fulton: The Defective AI
Released 15 July 2019
www.jealousbutcher.com

On The Defective AI (38’30”) Dave Fulton‘s dreamy headspaces and propulsive motorik rhythms are presented as equal forces. This album’s mood runs from an introverted experimentation to a pulsating, progressive, propulsive drive. Proudly descending from the Krautrock order, Fulton enhances its specific themes, as well as Spacemusic’s more expansive ideas, into new sparks of adventure. The energy ramps up, then winds down in dramatic cycles, as Fulton conducts his synthetic forces. Listeners to The Defective AI will find a few abrupt dynamic shifts – from pressure-less atmospheres of free falling tones and mostly ghostly electronics, to seething stretches of distinct musical texture and an insinuation of rock-drumming. An intense declaration may be heard in heroic lead lines, phasing tone clusters, rising sequencer runs and electo-percussive riffs – all meant to quicken and deepen the music. Amidst such bold statements are also passages of delicate electronic textures. Creating an area of spaciousness in which the listener gently drifts, Fulton builds his next musical trajectory. This intricately designed work aspires to be more than merely music lost in space, it reflects a passion for all things forward-looking. At its conception, the then new genre of Kosmische Musik promised us tomorrow. Many decades on we find innovative musicians still shaping this field with a combination of intellectual rigor and emotional focus. The Defective AI seems to be building something, hopefully a map, inside our heads – as we again set our sights and hopes on days yet to come.

Chuck van Zyl/STAR’S END11 July 2019

Craig Padilla & Marvin Allen: Toward the Horizon

Toward the Horizon

Toward the Horizon

Craig Padilla & Marvin Allen: Toward the Horizon
Released: 22 February 2019
www.spottedpeccary.com
www.craingpadilla.com

Synthesist Craig Padilla and guitarist Marvin Allen are dreaming a different dream than most Spacemusic philosophers. Throughout the collaboration Toward the Horizon we may hear that which is lighting so brightly inside their heads. As messages fly, ideas flower and synapses snap through the web of electrical circuits across the brain, each mind comes to life in collective play. As so much is riding in every composition, this duo’s sound becomes emotionally all-encompassing. Along its six track route Toward the Horizon grows gradually wider and more personal, until this work has thoroughly expanded into our listening space. Small at first, each piece initially feels narrowly contained, but soon rushes passionately wider. In tightly controlled performance this music thickens, to convey the joy of living, but also shades of solitude and doubt. We hear Allen’s strummed chords climbing slowly above Padilla’s warm electronics, as steely echoing guitar plays against the pulse of gentle sequencer patterns. Dark tumultuous textures act as contrast against this album’s drifting strings, reverberant synths and buzzing synthetic chords. But further in, a rumbling soundmass advances beneath glissando guitar lines and grainy sweeping pads; while further out, slow flow zones oscillate in swarms of glittering points. On the horizon Padilla and Allen can see the future approaching, knowing that somewhere in this distance shines a better day. Toward the Horizon is an album by men of deep mind, two who use music to renew their sense of wonder – and play us into someplace just short of the hereafter, but far beyond tomorrow.

Chuck van Zyl/STAR’S END4 July 2019

subtractiveLAD: Calm

Calm

Calm

subtractiveLAD: Calm
Released: 9 May 2019
www.stephenhummel.ca

As would a meteor seeking a lost sun, or something gradually falling in darkness, the three tracks on Calm (39’23”) move across a listening space. Sounding mildly on the twilight subtractiveLAD (aka Stephen Hummel) uses guitars and synthesizers to realize a softened Spacemusic. With sure pacing and sharp timing this EP does indeed exist as an innovative exercise in concision and imagination, but it will also prompt beautiful daydreams. Calm ably travels through the mind on reverb laden chords, and currents of jewel-toned steel strings. Quietly resplendent, we may imagine the constituent parts of these compositions as smooth shifting shapes that emerge out of fog, breathe, and then dissolve back into nothing. Rounded tones ride alone on an echoing current of flexing sound, while others give off a metal ringing. Recurring themes subtly spin fragments of melody, then transpose these phrases into a novel, vaguely familiar repetition. Threading its soft-hued lunar lullabies into active, ambient forms, a structure is more suggested than it is scored. Ending in a soft plum dawn, we could easily just stay floating there forever. Whether expressing soul searching florid adagios, or a poised private melancholy, Hummel’s ideas spread out in elegant waves of notes – each building with an unhurried sense of inevitability. His controlled improvisations move with nuance and empathy. A blur of slow gestures his hovering drones seem to offer the brightest possibilities for new beauty. As the mainstream cites all the evils of a world coming to its end, let us use this music to help renew our sense of wonder. As the future will be thus tamed, a great peace will lay over the land.

Chuck van Zyl/STAR’S END27 June 2019